Croftengea

Croftengea is, with Inchfad, one of the peatiest malts made at Loch Lomond –probably Scotland's most versatile distillery in terms of the number of different styles of whisky produced for different purposes on one site. The distillery was built by Littlemill Distillery Company Ltd, is a joint venture part-owned by the American distillers Barton Brands Ltd.

Barton took over complete ownership a few years later in 1971, but the distillery fell on hard times during the 1980s and was forced to close in 1984. Production resumed in 1987 under the new ownership of the Glen Catrine Bonded Warehouse company, an independent bottler seeking to control supplies of malt whisky for their own-label blends.

To this end, in addition to its two traditional potstills – and one Coffey still for grain whisky production, making Loch Lomond the only distillery in Scotland to produce both malt and grain whisky on the same site – Loch Lomond also has four Lomond stills (the name is coincidental as this style of still was originally developed for near neighbours Inverleven). Lomond stills have a traditional pot still base, but with the addition of a rectifying column instead of the traditional swan necks. Varying the distillation techniques has enabled the distillery to produce no less than eight different single malts of different styles on one site. The current yearly output from Loch Lomond is 10 million litres of grain whisky and around 2.5 million litres of single malt whisky.